Tag Archives: video

TETNG Video Week: You Think You Know…

This week, I’m going to post a series of videos from our Trauma Education: The Next Generation (TETNG) conference from last September. Regions Hospital, in conjunction with the Healthpartners Institute for Medical Education, created this conference to be new, different, and very TED-like. There were 20-minute live presentations, interspersed with fun 5-minute how-to videos. We dropped the staid and stodgy PowerPoint deck with tons of bullet points, moving to showing a few select graphic images that would drive home the point. No note taking!

I am the presenter for today’s video. It’s a little less than 20 minutes long, and deals with a problem that we all face: thinking we understand stuff that we really don’t. It’s another version of “you don’t know what you don’t know.” I talk about why this phenomenon occurs, and what you can do to avoid it.

Tomorrow: Field Amputation: Indications, Challenges, Techniques

Submental Intubation – The Video!

Yesterday, I described a technique for providing a secure yet short-term airway tailored to patients who can’t have a tube in their mouth or nose. Patients undergoing multiple facial fracture repair are probably the best candidates for this procedure.

A picture may be worth a thousand words, but a video is even better. Please note that it is explicit and shows the blow by blow surgical procedure. Of note, it is a quick and relatively simple advanced airway technique.

Related post:

Answer: What The Heck Video! Part 1

Several of you figured this one out! The patient was involved in a high speed car crash and was brought to the ED in respiratory distress.  Decreased left sided breath sounds were noted. The following xray was obtained.

Opacity is noted in the left lung field, and a modest pneumothorax is seen on the right. Bilateral first ribs are fractured, and the left second through fourth ribs are also broken. The patient was intubated and bilateral chest tubes were inserted.

There was minimal blood from the left chest tube, and a small amount of air from the right. Note the extensive subcutaneous emphysema.

What should we do next? Are any other diagnostic tests indicated? Could the endotracheal tube placement be part of the problem?

Related posts: