All posts by TheTraumaPro

Pop Quiz: The Case, Part 3

So our patient has presented to your ED, on foot, with a steak knife sticking out of his head! You’ve activated your trauma team, so now what do you do?

As always, start with a thorough physical exam. A good exam of the head is imperative, as is a scrupulous neurologic exam. In this case, the blade enters just below the right eye, traveling front to back and staying just about level.

Make sure there are no other injuries. Remember the Dang Factor! Don’t focus on the knife and miss other important injuries. And by all means, don’t take it out in the ED!

Since this patient is stable and neurologically intact, the surgeons will want a better idea of the structures involved under the skin. CT is the best tool for this, although there will be scatter from the metal. Here is a representative image:

So now, think about how you will get this out. Tweet and comment your answers.

Related post:

Pop Quiz! The Case, Part 2

Yesterday I presented the case of a young man who shows up at the triage desk in your ED with “something wrong with his head.” I showed an AP skull film, which shows some kind of metallic foreign object. What is it? Where is it? What to do?

First, look at the image carefully. The object is metallic density and appears very thin. But remember, any diagnostic image you view is a 2D representation of a 3D space. You have no idea of the orientation of the object, or exactly where (front to back) it is located. He could be lying on top of it, or it could be stuck in his brain.

At the far left side of the image, the thin metal appears to get even thinner. Dead giveaway! Look at the diagram below.

The knife tang is the thin part of a knife that the handle is fastened to. @andrewjtagg tweeted that he wouldn’t mind seeing a lateral, so here it is.

Yes, it’s a knife. A steak knife to be exact. Somewhere in the middle of the face.

First off, you didn’t need to see these to start doing the right things. Since this is a penetrating injury to the “head, neck or torso” it should trigger any trauma center’s highest level of activation. He is whisked off to the trauma bay and quickly evaluated. He’s obviously awake and alert (he walked in), so what do you need to treat him, and how would you manage it?

Tweet or leave comments. More discussion (and pictures) on Monday.

Pop Quiz! The Case

A young man presents to your emergency department walk-in area. Something is wrong with his head. Here is an AP skull film (when is the last time you got one of those?)

I’ll walk you through my thought processes over the next several days. First, what’s going on? And what should you do now? And next, and so on.

Please tweet and leave comments! My explanation of the initial steps tomorrow.

How To: Secure An Endotracheal Tube To… Nothing!

Several decades ago I took care of a patient who posed an interesting challenge. He had been involved in an industrial explosion and had sustained severe trauma to his face. Although he was able to speak and breathe, he had a moderate amount of bleeding and was having some trouble keeping his airway clear.

Everyone frets about getting an airway in patients who have severe facial trauma. However, I find it’s usually easier because the bones and soft tissue move out of your way. That is, as long as you can keep ahead of the bleeding to see your landmarks.

In this case, the intubation was easy. The epiglottis was visible while standing above the patient’s head, so a laryngoscope was practically unnecessary! But now, how do we secure the tube so it won’t fall out? Sure, there are tube-tamer type securing devices available, but what if they are not available to you? Or this happened in the field? Or it was in the 1980’s and it hadn’t been invented, like this case?

The answer is, create your own “skin” to secure the tube to. Take a Kerlix-type stretchable gauze roll and wrap it tightly around their head. Remember, they are sedated already and they can breathe through the tube. This also serves to further slow any bleeding from soft tissue. Once you have “mummified” the head with the gauze roll, tape the tube in place like you normally would, using the surface of the gauze as the “skin.”

Be generous with the tape, because the tube is your patient’s life-line. Now it’s time for the surgeons to surgically stabilize this airway, usually by converting to a tracheostomy. 

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The Newest Trauma MedEd Newsletter Is Available!

The April newsletter is now available! Click the image below or the link at the bottom to download. This month’s topic is Protocols (again). You’ll need a QR code reader if you want to download to your mobile device. Or just use the web URLs provided to download to your desktop/notebook.

In this issue you’ll find articles on:

  • Chest tube management
  • Solid organ injury
  • Rapid reversal of warfarin
  • Reversal of other anticoagulants
  • Massive transfusion

Subscribers had the newsletter emailed to them over the weekend. If you want to subscribe (and download back issues), click here.

Download the newsletter here!