Sample Pediatric Solid Organ Guideline: The Good vs The Bad

In order for a clinical practice guideline (CPG) to be both useful and readily used, they need to meet certain criteria. They must be:

  • Evidence-based (as much as that is possible given the current state of the literature) – don’t make stuff up if you don’t have to.
  • Action-oriented – they actually need to tell you what to do. They shouldn’t read like a book chapter.
  • Concise – the shorter the better.

If your CPG meets all three of these, then it’s got a pretty good chance of being followed. Here are samples of two CPGs for management of solid organ injury in kids.

Which one will you actually follow? Which one will make your brain melt?

Example 1

bad-peds-solid-organ

or Example 2?

good-peds-solid-organ

Bottom line: Follow the rules for crafting your own clinical practice guidelines. Or else nobody will follow it!

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